S'mores Australian Style: how to make Australian S'Mores

How to make Australian S'Mores guide





S'Mores is a camping treat you hear a lot about when reading stories from the USA.   It's a big thing over there.    No American camping trip is complete without partaking in the ritual of having a S'More.     But in Australia, it's doesn't register as a camping experience we must have.      

In the interest of all things camping and because chocolate was involved, I bravely decided to venture into an unknown cooking territory and try to replicate this traditional dessert here in Australia.
   

Wikipedia says they are a


traditional night-time campfire treat” and made up of “roasted marshmallow and a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two pieces of graham cracker”.

The marshmallow and chocolate – no problems – a trip to my cupboard and we have them.



The graham cracker – what is that?         





Australian S'Mores 
Photo credit:  D.Niblack



The graham cracker is elusive here in Australia, though some stores that stock American food products, will also stock these.  But it's not something you can grab from any supermarket here in Australia readily.



So substitutes are needed.


McVitie Digestives seem to be the closest.  I have also heard that Arnotts “Marie” biscuits are worth a go.




So  we decided to try to make an Australian S’More.   Here was "the plan":




    • Gather around a campfire
    • Get a Marie or McVities biscuit and put a piece of chocolate on it.
    • Cook a marshmallow over the campfire using a stick or whatever preferred method is.
    • Place the browned marshmallow on the biscuit that has the chocolate on it
    • Create a sandwich by putting the another biscuit on the marshmallow, let the marshmallow spread a bit eg.ooze
    • Wait 30 seconds for the warm marshmallow to melt the chocolate
    • Eat and enjoy!



      Well, let me tell you that after our first experience with a S’More, it needs some refinement.     We hit a couple of problems.....


      • Choice of biscuit – Marie by Arnotts.  It seemed a bit too thick and sweet.  It was like sugar overload and not in a good way.   See the bottom of this story for the alternative option using Oreos (found in all supermarkets) 
      •  Chocolate that goes on the biscuit – we used a Cadburys Twirl broken in half.    When the marshmallow went onto this chocolate, it just did not melt.   I waited 30 seconds but that chocolate stood firm long after 30 seconds.
      • Marshmallow – to get it really gooey, I sort of set it on fire, so it was all blackened (not sure if I am meant to do that), but it didn’t seem to retain heat to melt chocolate.




      Where did I go wrong?  (apart from not using a microwave)



      My kids enjoyed this new camping treat, but I was a bit disappointed.  

      I think it comes down to my biscuit choice.   
      Or maybe my chocolate choice.    
      Or then again, maybe my marshmallow cooking!!!



      We tried our own version at Easter.     You can see Easter S'Mores here



      Australian S'More
      Searching for S'Mores information is impressive for a newbie to the world of S'Mores - there are sites dedicated to recipes; how to cook them; bizarre S'More alternatives; and even a Facebook page dedicated to S'Mores.   

      This site had a delicious sounding recipe for Peanut Butter S'Mores.  Makes my mouth just water thinking about that combination.

       Or maybe you want to make your own S'More in a virtual experience?  


      Yes, at the Hersheys site you will be able to pretend you are making a S'More and create your own ultimate S'More without ever leaving your computer........Unless your computer keyboard is a giant S'More (see below)


      Australian S'Mores


      So, despite there being a lot of info out there for beginners, my S'More experience was not a huge hit.   


      I am not planning on giving up anytime soon - all those Americans can't be wrong - but I think the key elements to make a good S'More needs a small re-think on my part.


      Update:    Aldi has been selling the S'Mores Kit in June 2017, for the bargain price of $6 and you get 12 S'Mores out of it, and using all the American products to recreate this S'More delight.    I can't guarantee how long this supermarket will have them, but worth having a look! 




      Alcoholic S'More Alternative



      S'Mores not for you?    Then  adults, you need to seriously consider this drink - S'Moretinis



      S'Moreo



      So you don't have the crackers, but you have Oreos?    Then you are ready for a new taste sensation.   The S'Moreo. 


      See how to make it here:








      (FYI:  This post was originally published in 2012, and has been updated to maintain accuracy and be informative as possible).



      Lead photo:
      "S’more" (CC BY 2.0) by  smith_family 

      51 comments :

      1. Actually, the chocolate not melting is a problem with s'mores. I just reviewed the Coleman S'more Maker. It solves this problem, but if you leave it over the campfire too long the chocolate gets too melted and it becomes a mess. Thanks so much for the shout out.

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        1. It sounds like there is an art to getting this dessert just right! We will give it another go next camping trip and hopefully refine some of our issues. Thanks for your advice.

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      2. There is definitely an art to making s'mores. First of all, they are supposed to be overly sweet. They are a special treat and not something to be eaten often, so go ahead and indulge a few times a year. Secondly, if you make them right, they will be a goody sticky mess. There should be chocolate dripping down your arm. But, they're meant to be eaten outside, so that's ok! Lastly, the key to getting the chocolate to melt is to use thin pieces of MILK chocolate, preferably Hershey's. They are the perfect size and the perfect meltiness. Good luck and don't give up! They are worth it!

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        1. Thanks for your comment! I think I definitely went wrong with my chocolate choice - it wasn't thin enough like you suggest. We will persist, thanks to all the great support and emails I have received from US readers!

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        2. Try Lindt squares, giant roaster camping marshmallows and Arnott Granita biscuits. If you still can't get the chocolate to melt, chest by using Arnotts chocolate coated granita biscuits...

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        3. Not sure why you need the chocolate. Two Marie biscuits with a singed marshmallow squashed between is a wonderful memory from camping days.

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        4. Go and try Arnotts Choc Wheatens. They are similar to Granita biscuits but already have a thin layer of chocolate on them which does easily melt with the hot marshmallow.
          We did try using Granita and the Cadbury Fury Friends (thin chocolate retcangles) but the Choc Wheatens worked best!

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      3. Now you've made me want to go out and make s'mores! The truth is, you never get it just right, it's always a mess. A sweet, sweet mess.

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        1. I agree with the mess bit! Eating them seems to be a bit of an art form that we need to perfect!

          Thanks for your comment - hope you get to eat some S'mores soon!

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      4. This is awesome! Until I started blogging some 3 years back, I had no idea s'mores were strictly an American thing. To be quite honest, our family much prefers just roasting marshmallows. The addition of the chocolate & cracker seem too sweet to all of us (and we LOVE a good dessert). Keep up the practice - look for a nice light brown on the marshmallows - don't let it catch on fire!

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        1. Very much American food. We don't have the key ingredient for it which doesn't help in its reproduction, and like you, I agree, it is VERY sweet. Maybe I need to discover a new camping dessert?

          Thanks for your comment.

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      5. Today (04.12.2012) was the first time I'd ever heard of S'mores. I Googled it and the result seemed like something I wanted to try. When I went looking for a recipe, I found several, all using Graham crackers. I've heard of them many, many times but don't think we have them in Australia. I even found a recipe (an American one) for making Graham crackers but, with 13 ingredients, there was no way I was going to make them. I'm about to go to the supermarket where I'll look for them - my mum says she has seen them on the shelves ocasionally.

        It seems the best way to make them indoors is to lay your biscuit on a piece of aluminium foil, add a thin piece of chocolate (there are a couple of brands available but they're not cheap), a marshmallow and then top with another biscuit. Wrap the foil around this concoation and then on a flat biscuit slice tray in an oven pre-heated to 180 degrees C for about 10 - 15 minutes - I'm inclined to think 10 mintes would be sufficient time for the chocolate to melt without "cooking" it. Remove from the oven and let cool, on the tray or a cooling rack, to eating temperature. I think this should only take a couple of minutes.

        I hope this might be of some help.

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        1. Thanks so much for your comment and all that great information. I think the Lindt Thins would be a good choice for the chocolate. I hadn't really thought much about doing them in the oven at home, but your suggestion sounds like a wonderful way to try them (with minimum fuss).

          Thanks for sharing.

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      6. The best way to do it is to take your time 'roasting' the marshmallow. You want to keep it at the desired length away from the fire and slowly turn it. You don't want it to brown too quickly. If you take your time it should be a light golden brown on the outside. At that point in time it should be ooey gooey in the middle. That way the inside is molten and an is the perfect temp. I also find that a chocolate bar similar to a Hershey's bar is best. It has to be a thin piece of chocolate, probably the height of a Crunch bar. I'm not sure what you guys have available in Australia. The end result will be overly sweet, and I can only have one, but it is a backyard barbecue staple for us. When I was pregnant with my last baby 2 years ago that was all I wanted. I made them in the microwave! lol

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      7. Thanks for stopping by Kathleen and excellent tips on browning a marshmallow. I think I must be very impatient with it, as mine always go black within seconds....so there is an art to it obviously!!! You sound like you have perfected it.

        I am glad I am not the only one who thinks they are overly sweet....one would definitely be enough (though pregnancy can do weird things to you. I used to crave McDonalds..ugh).

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      8. Honestly... it's just not a s'more without the graham cracker. They're the perfect density, not too soft not too hard, a hint of honey and not overly sweet.

        You need to slooooooowly heat the marshmallow so it gets gooey (though I like to light mine on fire to get a crispy charred crust).

        And a thin milk chocolate (dark is fine too). Hershey's is pretty perfect. they break off into the perfect size to fit on a Nabisco Honey Maid Graham Cracker.

        FYI: Did you know the graham cracker was invented by a preacher as a way to curb masturbation? [cue shooting star with rainbow tail: The More You Know!]

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      9. I have definitely learned something today about the creator of a Graham cracker. S'Mores may never be the same again for some our readers!

        Thanks for commenting and sharing your S'More story.

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      10. Try US foods in Moorabbin for the crackers

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      11. As a Brownie Guide (like a Girl Scout in the US) camping in Australia and NZ as a kid, we used the chocolate-coated girl guide biscuits. Don't need to worry about having to fuss around with chocolate that way. If it's the wrong season for those, chocolate wheaten biscuits work just as well.

        Some people like to burn the outside of their marshies and have slightly uncooked centres. But I like to look for cooler embers and slowly slowly roast mine until they are perfectly golden on the outside and totally soft on the inside. Yum!

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        1. I never get to toast mine slowly - I just can't wait! I make them all go black and then eat them! You must have greater willpower than me.

          Choc Wheatens - might have to give that a go too!


          Thanks for stopping by.

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      12. This is awesome! LOVE IT! Must try the recipe - mum used to use Marie biscuits when she made rum balls... with real rum =D

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        1. Rum balls......yummy. Now I am thinking about THEM!

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      13. Hi,
        After hearing about s'mores in lots of American films/TV, I have been wanting to try them out.
        My 3yo and I just tried out making smores in the oven - we trialed Chocolate Wheaton (without adding more chocolate squares), Arnotts Shredded Wheatmeal & McVities Lights biscuits. Shredded wheatmeal was the best, as they came out the crunchiest.
        We used Lindt milk chocolate, as it was the thinnest chocolate on the shelf at the supermarket. It melted fine.
        They were very sweet, and none of us could finish a whole one, but something fun to try out.

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        1. I am with you - I think they are nice to try out, but bit rich. The Lindt choc Thins are good choice but if its that rich, do we really want to waste Lindt on them!!!!

          Great idea with the McVities too! I just love them at any time.

          Thanks for visiting our site.

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      14. This is the second time I've read about S'mores this week! They must be the new thing. I just can't get my head around them though lol. I think I'll stick with my toasted (read: burnt) marshamallows.

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        1. S'Mores are creeping into Aussie way of life! But they have been around forever in USA - reports go back to 1925 when they first appeared! There is even a National S'More Day in USA (naturally!!)

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      15. It's funny, because I had to Google what a S'more was after seeing them on so many US blogs. I had never thought to try it out myself until seeing your post. Thank you for the inspiration x

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        1. Thanks for stopping by Cybele - hope you get to try them out, but warning - rich & messy!!!!

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      16. I had not experienced ttese, knowingly, but if you can find new zealand biscuts "thins" made by griffins, I buy mine at crazy clarks, they are a thin biscut with a thin choc coating on one side. when camping while viving in new zealand we would toast marshmallows over fire or a portable camp stove, then squash marshmallow between 2 biscuts, chocolate on the inside of sandwich, they are delicious.

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        1. Thanks for that info Donna - I will keep an eye out for those biscuits, as you never know when they will be imported here. They sound a bit like our Choc Wheatens.

          Thanks for visiting.

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      17. I think the chocolate not melting may be a problem with your chocolate. Manufacturers put some extra ingredients in their chocolate for warmer climates to PREVENT them from melting. You might try using Nutella instead. When camping we use Chocolate chip cookies in place of the graham crackers and the chocolate thins, much easier.

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        1. That sounds a great alternative! I will give it a try next time! Thx.

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      18. I've been eating S'mores since I was a kid and I'm Aussie. So they've been around a fair while here... Granted, I'm only 22, so the time when I was a kid actually wasn't that long ago haha!
        Anyway, we've always made ours with the Arnott's chocolate wheaten biscuits. We don't add any extra chocolate. With the marshmallow, you don't shove it straight into the middle of the fire,sort of let it JUST touch the flame. If it sets on fire quickly pull it out and blow it out. I also put mine under the grill when I'm craving one and don't have a camp fire handy. Just one biscuit with the marshmallow on top and then I put the other biscuit on top when the marshmallow is golden brown. I like these ones coz I don't think they're overly sweet, the biscuit have only a thin layer of chocolate :)

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        1. Choc Wheatens would be a great alternative as well, and I like the idea of doing them at home with the grill!

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      19. I've been eating S'mores since I was a kid and I'm Aussie. So they've been around a fair while here... Granted, I'm only 22, so the time when I was a kid actually wasn't that long ago haha!
        Anyway, we've always made ours with the Arnott's chocolate wheaten biscuits. We don't add any extra chocolate. With the marshmallow, you don't shove it straight into the middle of the fire,sort of let it JUST touch the flame. If it sets on fire quickly pull it out and blow it out. I also put mine under the grill when I'm craving one and don't have a camp fire handy. Just one biscuit with the marshmallow on top and then I put the other biscuit on top when the marshmallow is golden brown. I like these ones coz I don't think they're overly sweet, the biscuit have only a thin layer of chocolate :)

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      20. The absolute best way to make Australian S'mores is to use Australian Gir Guide biscuits in place of the graham crackers. (Try the chocolate coated ones - mini or full size - then you only need to roast and add the marshmallow.) The downside is that teh biscuits are only sold once per year (around May).

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        1. I haven't had those GG biscuits for ages, and now I know why, if they are only sold once a year! I best stock up next time they are out.

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      21. holy moly - brings back my experience from American summer camp where we completely overindulged in s'mores which were the thing to do and now just the sight of them gives me the same feeling in the pit of my stomach that induces that rather queasy memory of over indulgence - of course though kids find it such a treat! thanks for the memories :)

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        1. Over indulging in them would be bad! They are so rich (well, the versions I have tried). Thanks for comment.

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      22. Same as a few other of your commenters above ... no Kiwi GirlGuide camp is complete without s'mores (some more) made with the chocolate coated GirlGuide biscuits.

        Did you know you can make them in the microwave? Pop a chocolate covered GG bikkie chocolate side up on a plate. Place the marshmallow on it and microwave for 20 - 30 secs (depends on your microwave. Remove and squish the other biscuit on the top (chocolate inward facing of course) and voila a s'more anytime you want. Personally I can't really get into S'more but they are a hit with the kiddlings. ;)

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        1. The kids love them more than I do I must admit due to sweetness overload. I have other preferred desserts to S'Mores these days. But your microwave idea is great, and definitely worth trying in these summer months when campfires are not allowed.

          Thanks for dropping by.

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      23. for this chocolate how about using cadburys furry friends I think there is six in a packet and they are thin just a suggestion

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      24. I have a few recommendations as a seasoned s'more maker.

        First, when roasting your marshmallow make sure the fire has been burning a good long while so you get a good amount of coals going under the flames. This is the hottest area of the fire and if you continue twirling your marshmallow and pull back into cooler air you'll avoid it catching fire (trust me, those coals w/o flame will light up your marshmallow real quick). When you achieve that elusive golden brown take it out and get it on your chocolate and cracker.

        Second, if you don't have access to thin chocolate (such as a Hershey bar) then try something that has a thin outside and a soft substance inside. We've done super rich s'mores with a Reese's peanut butter cup. It is thin enough chocolate that it melts easily and the peanut butter inside is already soft so it's an added bonus.

        Don't despair if this is your first time (or even first dozen). Like anything else it does get easier after the trial and error period.

        As a last resort if you can't get good cracker or chocolate, then get your marshmallow golden brown and just pop the hardened outside in your mouth and start again. Much less sweet, but just as enjoyable!

        What do Aussie's enjoy eating around the campfire as a treat?

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      25. This was so interesting to read! I didn't realize s'mores was an American thing. I think they are definitely a kid's delight and perhaps a little too sweet for most adults. It's a tradition and I loved them as a kid, but have no desire to eat them as an adult. I only do so to pass on the tradition to my daughter. To curb the sweetness, you might try using dark chocolate. You could create dark chocolate shavings and bring them in a ziploc bag to your camp fire event...and then put a few sprinkles on your graham cracker or alternative biscuit. We are going to a friend's house tonight and using her back yard fire pit to have the s'more experience before summer is officially over.

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      26. What about a marshmallow between 2 Tim Tams?

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      27. Graham Crackers are sold in Austalia... U can buy them in store or online from 'USA Foods' in Moorabbin........
        Now we can ALL enjoy S'mores using the original American Graham Crackers...!!! I really hope this helps :)))

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      28. This comment has been removed by the author.

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      29. We made them using Cadbury's Furry Friends and McVities biscuits. Arnotts Granita biscuits would work well too.
        We used half a piece of chocolate and put in two roasted marshmallows, one one each side of chocolate. Perfectly melted chocolate. Could only eat one though.

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      30. Hi Guys if you are camping smores lovers like myself and my family then you will love these marshmallow roasting forks they are great 8 in a set telescopic 32inch extended great for the little ones not getting to close to the fire here is the link https://www.ebay.com.au/ulk/itm/1519772960

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      31. Hey, just wanted to share that Australian s'mores are too easy to make, try this:

        • Arnotts chocolate wheaten biscuits
        • campfire marshmallows

        Not the same to the American version, but very close to it.

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      32. Also ... Girl Guide Traditional Biscuits with thin chocolate (we use the Furry Friends Bars) - whorks great. However, the chocolate wheaten also sound like the way to go. We toast the marshmallows over a candle. Yum!!

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